Polynesian Christmas: Flowers in Your Hair


Once upon a time in the islands you could pluck a flower that suited your fancy and place it carefully behind your ear and continue along your merry way. You knew enough to know that was not acceptable on the mainland, even then. However even in the islands I would caution against such a loose relationship with flower-ownership now.

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But do not be dismayed! I have several workarounds for you. Whether you are an island dweller or a mainlander, you don’t need to go to San Francisco just for flowers in your hair.

If you prefer to keep real flowers in your hair, but you don’t want to be “that person” picking from someone else’s garden, look for a flower that has fallen to the ground. Once it is no longer attached, it is fair game. Pick up that beauty from the ground and enjoy the aroma of a fresh flower. It won’t last longer than a day, but I find beauty in the temporary nature of it.

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Now a fresh flower is not always practical. Perhaps fresh flowers are not in season where you are. Perhaps you are sensitive or even allergic. Or, perhaps, you’ve had back luck getting a fragile flower to stay put. I find my glasses often hinder my flower (and yet sometimes they really do help to anchor the flower. Go figure.) In these instances a foam flower is an excellent choice.

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Remember the flower and you will remember to smile. It isn’t the flower that brightens someone else’s day, but your own radiance. (The flower just helps.)

And also remember that while women comprise the majority of flower-wearers, men can wear flowers too, Thanks, Kap, for leading the way!

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This post is part of our month-long exploration into Polynesian Christmas traditions and inspirations. See the whole collection of activities and discoveries here.

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